Upcoming Courses

Tentative Winter 2017

 

99+ Courses = Upper Division Undergraduate Courses
200+ Courses = Graduate Division Courses

 

American IndianStudies M10. Introduction to American Indian Studies (5)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; activity, one hour. Survey of selected Native North American cultures from pre-Western contact to contemporary period, with particular emphasis on early cultural diversity and diverse patterns of political, linguistic, social, legal, and cultural change in postcontact period. P/NP or letter grading.

MW 12:30p – 1:45p

Friday Discussion sections
P. Nabokov

 

American Indian Stds M118Retention and Outreach Issues in Higher Education
(Same as Afro-American Studies M118, Asian American Studies M168, and Chicana and Chicano Studies M118.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of issues in outreach and retention of students in higher education, especially through student-initiated programs, efforts, activities, and services, with focus on UCLA as case. Letter grading.

F 11:00A-2:50P

A. Valenzuela (consent of instructor)

 

American Indian Stds C121 Working in Tribal Communities: Preparing for Fieldwork
Lecture. Through readings, discussion, Native guest lecturers, project participation, introduction to rules of conduct and skills necessary to successfully work & carry out community service projects for Native communities/organizations. Concurrent with C221.

M 1:00p – 3:50p

W. Teeter

 

American Indian Stds 197. Individual Studies in American Indian Studies (2 to 4) *Individual Contract

Tutorial, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned readings and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

 

American Indian Stds 199C. Individual Studies: Capstone Synthesis (4) *Individual Contract

Tutorial, three hours. Preparation: successful completion of eight upper division major courses. Limited to senior American Indian Studies majors. Faculty members help students relate their course-derived academic experience to their original research/service efforts involving Native American communities. Completion of research paper and presentation of student work at year-end Research Symposium required. Must be taken in conjunction with AM IND C122SL or an alternative upper division course approved by program chair and academic coordinator. Letter grading.

 

American Indian Studies M200D. Economic Principles & Development in Indigenous Communities

Seminar, two hours; discussion, one hour. Limited to graduate students. Introduction to basic economic concepts and their application to issues of economic development in indigenous communities. Coverage of microeconomic and macroeconomic aspects of economic development using current and existing research. Letter grading.

W 3:00p – 5:50p

R. Akee

 

American Indian Stds C221 Working in Tribal Communities:  Preparing for Fieldwork
Lecture. Through readings, discussion, Native guest lecturers, project participation, introduction to rules of conduct and skills necessary to successfully work & carry out community service projects for Native American communities/organizations. Concurrent scheduled with C121. S/U or letter grading.

M 1:00p – 3:50p
W. Teeter

 

American Indian Studies M265A. Federal Indian Law I

Lecture, three to four hours. Overview of federal Indian law, including nature and history of tribal federal legal and political relationship; basic legal definitions within federal Indian law (such as what is Indian country); equal protection issues posed by federal Indian legislation; canons of construction unique to Indian law; tribal sovereignty and its protection; basic questions of federal and state authority within Indian country; and tribal, federal, and state jurisdiction in Indian country according to default rules as well as special statutory regimes. May be concurrently scheduled with Law 267. S/U or letter grading. [Law School Semester starts later than Winter Quarter].

MTR 9:00a – 10:15a

A Riley

American Indian Studies M272. Seminar: Cultural Property Law

Units: 3 or 4

(Same as Law M514.) Seminar, three hours. Exploration of identity, ownership, appropriation, and repatriation of both tangible and intangible cultural property -- those items that are of great significance to cultural heritage and cultural survival of people. Consideration of importance of preservation of cultural property as means of maintaining group identity, self-determination, and collective rights. Examination of both international and domestic law governing these issues, addressing such questions as How should cultural property be defined? Can cultural property by protected under existing intellectual property and cultural property regimes? How can we balance protection of cultural property against need or desire for its use in creative expression or scientific advancement? Examination of cultural property of groups in general, with emphasis on cultural property of indigenous peoples, including folklore, traditional knowledge, burial grounds, sacred sites, and ancient ceremonies and traditions. S/U or letter grading. [Law School Semester starts later than Winter Quarter].

T 1:00p – 3:00p
A. Riley

 

 

Courses that can be used towards the Major/Minor

 

Anthropology 9. Culture and Society (5)

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; fieldwork. Required as preparation for both bachelor's degrees. Introduction to study of culture and society in comparative perspective. Examples from societies around world to illustrate basic principles of formation, structure, and distribution of human institutions. Of special concern is contribution and knowledge that cultural diversity makes toward understanding problems of modern world. P/NP or letter grading.

TR 11:00a – 12:15p

Discussion sections TWR

 

Anthropology C144 Native American Languages and Cultures
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 33 or American Indian Studies M10. Introduction and comparative analysis of sociocultural aspects of language use in Native North American Indian speech communities. Specific foci include both micro- and macro-sociolinguistic topics. Micro-sociolinguistic topics are comprised of such issues as multilingualism, cultural differences regarding appropriate communicative behavior and variation within speech communities (e.g., male and female speech, baby talk, ceremonial speech, etc.). Macro-sociolinguistic considerations include language contact and its relationship to language change and language in American Indian education. P/NP or letter grading.

TR 9:30 – 10:45A

P. Kroskrity

 

Anthropology 172B. Change and Continuity among Native North Americans (4)

Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 172A. Consideration of tremendous change Native American societies and cultures have undergone since European contact. Emphasis on patterns of adaptation and continuity as Native Americans confronted colonization and its implications. Letter grading.

TR 11:00a – 12:15P

R. Thornton

 

 

Anthropology C243P Seminar on Native American Languages and Cultures
Lecture, three hours; seminar, two hours. Preparation: prior coursework in either anthropology, linguistics, or American Indian studies. Introduction and comparative analysis of sociocultural aspects of language use in Native North American Indian speech communities. Specific foci include both micro- and macro-sociolinguistic topics. Micro-sociolinguistic topics are comprised of such issues as multilingualism, cultural differences regarding appropriate communicative behavior and variation within speech communities (e.g., male and female speech, baby talk, ceremonial speech, etc.). Macro-sociolinguistic considerations include language contact and its relationship to language change and language in American Indian education. S/U or letter grading.

W 9:00 – 11:50A
P. Kroskrity


Anthropology 284P Methods and Data Analysis
Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Recommended preparation: research design course. Hands-on approach to qualitative methods used in anthropological research and techniques for analysis of qualitative data. Particular methods depend on and are appropriate to research questions and designs students bring to class. S/U or letter grading.
F 9:00 -11:50
J. Cattelino (Permission from Instructor)

 

 

Chicana/o Studies 201. Activist Scholarship and Intersectional Methodologies

Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Exploration of four critical epistemologies, or schools of thought, that employ intersectional methodologies as basis for social action research -- Chicana/Chicano cultural studies, Chicana feminism, queer studies, and critical legal studies. S/U or letter grading.
T 2:00 – 4:50p
A. Gaspar De Alba

 

Gender Studies 185 Lecture 4
[Description in progress]
MW 9:30a – 10:45a

M. Erai

 

 

World Arts and Cultures 33. Indigenous Worldviews

Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to study of indigenous worldviews as they are expressed through art, mythology, ritual, health practice, languages, and ecology. With examples spanning globe, consideration of issues of colonialism, tradition, religious change, and legal and social implications of epistemological differences between people. Examination of critical perspectives on social development, historical progress, and intellectual assimilation.
MW 4:00p – 5:50p

Discussion sections R
D. Shorter

 

World Arts and Culture CM140/CM240 Healers, Ritual, and Transformation
Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Examination of role of healers, historically and within contemporary culture-specific contexts. Exploration of psychological functions served by rites of passage and healing rituals and of role of arts in healing troubled communities. Concurrently scheduled with course CM140. S/U or letter grading.
TR 12:00p – 1:50p
D. Shorter

 

World Arts and Culture 210 Ethnography of and as Colonialism
Seminar, three hours. Beginning with 1550 debates over Indian humanity and ranging to contemporary scholarship about and by indigenous peoples, focus on intersections of writing, colonialism, violence, and historiography in Americas. Exploration of relationship between 16th-century reasoning about race and postmillennial, Western, and academic practices of writing history. Development of critical stance on utility of postcolonial theories as such perspectives bear on anthropological and historical studies of indigenous religiosity. Regions include southwest Columbia, Orinoco Delta in Venezuela, Valley of Mexico, and several examples throughout U.S. southwest, plains, and northeast. S/U or letter grading.
R 6:00p – 8:50p
D. Shorter (Consent of instructor)

 

NOTE: This listing is not all-inclusive and is merely a guide to be used in consultation with the Chair of the program and/or your academic/faculty advisor. The listing of a course here should not be considered a recommendation for all students. Since each student has unique program needs, courses from this list and elsewhere should be discussed with advisors before enrollment. Also, please consider other courses outside of the program or not listed, if that course or instructor is relevant to your studies!