Current Courses

American Indian Studies Fall 2016

Undergrad

M10. Introduction to American Indian Studies

(Same as World Arts and Cultures M23.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; activity, one hour. Survey of selected Native North American cultures from pre-Western contact to contemporary period, with particular emphasis on early cultural diversity and diverse patterns of political, linguistic, social, legal, and cultural change in postcontact period. P/NP or letter grading.

C120. Working in Tribal Communities: Introduction

Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, students learn to participate within Native American communities engaged in political, social, and cultural processes of change and preservation. Development of proposal for Native nation-building project. Concurrently scheduled with course C220. Letter grading.

M162. Language Endangerment and Linguistic Revitalization

Units: 4

(Same as Anthropology M162.) Lecture, three hours; activity, one hour. Requisites: course M10, Anthropology 33. Examination of causes and consequences of current worldwide loss of linguistic diversity and revelation of kinds of efforts that members of threatened heritage language communities have produced in their attempt to revitalize these languages. Projected loss of as many as half of world's languages by end of 21st century can only be explained as outcome of such factors as nationalism, global economic forces, language ideological change, and language shift away from smaller indigenous and tribal languages. Since loss of such languages means both reduction of cultural as well as linguistic diversity, many affected communities have engaged in various language renewal practices. Examination of some diverse strategies that have been attempted, including immersion, language and culture classes, master-apprentice, interactive multimedia, mass media approaches, and language policy-reform approaches. Evaluation of effectiveness of these measures and of very imagery used to discuss language endangerment. P/NP or letter grading.

 

CM168. Healthcare for American Indians

Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Identification of traditional health beliefs, health practices, and healthcare systems of American Indian tribes to understand role of U.S. government in healthcare services for Indian people. Description of health problems that have affected American Indian people and definition of contemporary health issues and measures taken to raise health status of American Indian people. Concurrently scheduled with course C268. Letter grading.

187. Special Topics in American Indian Studies: Indgienous Women and Violence

This course explores the multiple issues of violence confronted by indigenous women throughout the world. We will consider the historic foundations that have produced and continue to produce the structures that enact violence on Native women and their communities. We will engage with Native women not as victims, but as women who are asserting particular cultural, feminist, and anti-violence methods to address ongoing colonial state violence, various forms of symbolic violence, and direct physical violence that goes unaddressed in communities and in society.  We will explore active, on-going struggles for decolonization and its relationship to gender issues.   While the focus is global, the course does not attempt to address all parts of the world. Rather, we will look at a range of locations (both homelands and diasporic) and consider how differing colonial structures and histories, combined with current political contexts and race/class formations, create different or similar dynamics of violence that affect indigenous women.

199C. Individual Studies: Capstone Synthesis

Tutorial, three hours. Preparation: successful completion of eight upper division major courses. Limited to senior American Indian Studies majors. Faculty members help students relate their course-derived academic experience to their original research/service efforts involving Native American communities. Completion of research paper and presentation of student work at year-end Research Symposium required. Must be taken in conjunction with American Indian Studies C122SL or an alternative upper division course approved by program chair and academic coordinator. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

 

Graduate

C220. Working in Tribal Communities: Introduction

Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, students learn to participate within Native American communities engaged in political, social, and cultural processes of change and preservation. Development of proposal for Native nation-building project. Concurrently scheduled with course C120. S/U or letter grading.

 

228A. Tribal Legal Systems

(Formerly numbered M228A.) Seminar, two hours. Course 228A is enforced requisite to 228B. Study of traditional and contemporary legal systems of Native American tribal nations. Detailed examination of several different tribal systems, including Navajo, Cherokee, Iroquois, and Hopi, with emphasis on diversity of tribal legal regimes, comparisons with Anglo-American legal system, changes in tribal systems during period of contact with non-Indians, and relationship between tribes' legal systems and other aspects of their cultures, such as religion and social structure. Independent research paper with focus on contemporary or historic topic required. Concurrently scheduled with Law 528. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 228B)

 

C268. Healthcare for American Indians

Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Identification of traditional health beliefs, health practices, and healthcare systems of American Indian tribes to understand role of U.S. government in healthcare services for Indian people. Survey of Federal Indian Health programs and development of Indian Healthcare System and Tribal/Urban Indian Health programs to understand health problems that have affected American Indian people and definition of contemporary health issues and measures taken to raise health status of American Indian people. Concurrently scheduled with course CM168. Letter grading.